Any of y'all deleted Twitter and/or Facebook from your devices? How do you fight the habit?


#1

I’ve made a bad habit of picking up my phone in the morning and looking at Twitter, and wow that’s terrible. I’ve deleted it and Facebook from my phone, but I want to know if anyone has any tips or advice on actually breaking the habit of picking up your phone to look at the hell websites. Have you just subbed different sites that are less terrible, do you look at Instagram or Discord or something instead? Do you try to keep yourself occupied with other stuff in the times you’d be picking your phone up?

I like to draw and I’m thinking I can make a habit of picking up my sketchbook instead of looking at the depressing internet. What helped y’all get away from these types of habits?


#2

If you deleted them, isn’t that enough? You can’t look at something that isn’t there.


#3

Early morning twitter is a bad idea, I agree. One thing you have up your sleeve against your habit is that you and your phone are both separate entities, and if the urge to check hellsites grows too powerful, I recommend leaving your phone out of eyesight in a different room. There is something nice about being unable to either hear or see notifications coming up, it kind of lets you regain control of your attention


#4

I deleted Twitter a couple months ago and had no desire to go back, and Facebook I keep just to stay in touch on Messenger and the occasional happy birthday message. But yea, I’ve replaced looking at those sites mainly through getting into Instagram (cute animals and positivity!), Discord, and checking out these forums. It has really helped my mood, no doubt.

In general, I’ve stopped checking US news sources and spent less time on international news as a whole. I’m lucky being Canadian in that while our domestic situation isn’t great, it’s also not nearly as depressing as elsewhere.

If you do need something else, I’ve heard from multiple people that mindless clicker games are a great way to satiate the need to check your phone without making you feel like crap. Perhaps that’s worth giving a shot.


#5

I got rid of twitter and facebook off my phone (and actually just straight-up deleted my Twitter account) and my life is so much better.

I pass the poopin’ time by reading ebooks. It’s way more productive and healthier for me than dunking my head into the raw sewage stream that is twitter.

I still have the 'gram because of course I am a huge hypocrite and I gotta have some sort of social media validation


#6

I quit twitter over a year ago but still kept checking it… Finally deleted my account earlier this year.

Part of how I cope is by being on a really good Mastodon instance, one that brooks no bullshit from the kind of people twitter says are fine.


#7

I have been deleting the twitter app and adding it back on the last six months. I finally deleted my twitter yesterday. One thing that helped me is setting up an rss reader. That way I have something to spray information at me, but there shouldn’t be something random that brings me down.


#8

I have to keep Facebook, because it’s the sole form of communication for a bunch of my old friends and family. I’ve been trying to scale back my ingestion of it though, taking some apps off my phone.


#9

the good news is that you’ve realized that going straight to your phone first thing in the morning is a potentially harmful addiction. getting through that can be tough but it’s super important that you’ve realized it’s a problem. i think the best way is to (as you mentioned) replace this habit with a healthier one. drawing in the morning sounds great. running in the morning, meditating in the morning, things like that. just drinking a cup of coffee or tea and looking out the window and taking time to be present with your thoughts. all of these are preferable to immediate morning phone time imo. it’s tough to do but once you start changing the habit, creating a pathway in your mind for a more positive habit, it becomes easier and easier. you can do it!


#10

One thing I really like to do is to go out for the day and leave my phone at home. If I have to go to the coffee shop, or the library, or work, and I probably won’t need my phone, it’s nice to just not bring it. Spending more time far away from the phone lets new habits form organically. You’ll be drawn back to doing what you’d do otherwise. Once reunited with your phone, hopefully some of the habits you were reminded of will also draw you.


#11

On my ~20 minute bus ride to campus most mornings, I’ve been trying to just sit there instead of look at my phone. It’s nice to look out the window every morning and stare at the people on the bus. I’ve felt for a long time that I could probably substitute much of the time I spend on my phone (like during lunch breaks, commuting when not biking, at home before bed) with reading. Even if it’s just a book of short stories or something, it seems very doable.

The new Screen Time thing on iPhone is pretty eye-opening to see. My average time just spent looking at my phone is like 2-2.5 hours per day, and that just seems like such a waste of time. I get next to nothing out of reddit except for like video game news and an occasional look at some pretty awful view points on things in the news.


#12

I got rid of FB about four years ago. I have never missed it ever. I highly recommend it. I understand it helps some people keep up with old friends. Two things on that: (a) Do you really want to keep up with them? (honestly?); and (b) getting rid of it forces you to keep up with just people you care about, and do so in more meaningful ways. It essentially leads you to find out who you actually care about, who you’ll put in effort to actually communicate with.

Please, get rid of FB


#13

Can you read on the bus? I found, when I visited NYC, that the long subway rides were a perfect excuse to read. I was on a 1-week vacation, and I read half a book!


#14

Yeah my college town is definitely nowhere near the size of NY. 20 minutes sometimes feels really short in the morning, but that time really adds up quick. And especially in the winter when I won’t get to ride my bike, I’ll be on that thing every day. I almost wish I had a longer commute to have more of an excuse to settle in more.


#15

As others have mentioned, I broke my early morning twitter habit with a combination of Ebooks, an RSS reader, and these forums.

In terms of mental health I’ve found ebooks to be the best thing first thing in the morning. I can’t help but read something when I’m drinking my morning coffee and a good book is such a nice way to start the day.


#16

Folks have been saying that RSS readers are a good way to replace your news feed and I’d agree. Been using those for years and years. It’s great.

That said, I still have trouble staying off those services during the day, especially at work.
I resolved this by using the Freedom app. I have it on iPhone and I think it’s also on Android, and it also has a desktop app.
Basically it allows me to set times that certain sites and services are blocked on whatever device I have it logged in on.

It worked for me to get out of my Reddit habit completely, and it keeps me off certain sites during work hours.

You do gotta pay for the service though. There are free alternatives, but this one is worth it for me personally.

It’s not perfect. You can’t edit block lists while it is active on your device. On iOS (not sure about android) if you close the app if won’t block/unblock sites/apps when the time comes and you’ll have to reopen it. Facebook can’t be blocked through the app, so I deleted the app and only access it through a browser.

But it was exactly what I needed to break the habit. I even use it when I’m working on a personal project and I just need to cut out distractions.


#17

I’ve read 35 books this year after deleting Twitter and Facebook off my phone. I’m worried sometimes I’m missing on news events or good analyses of them but I hated the feeling of constantly scrolling down my phone all day. I’ve just tried to have a couple of books and my 3DS on me all the time so I’m more likely to dive into one of them than check social media and it’s working so far.


#18

unfortunately i have to keep up with facebook in order to keep up with certain friends and associates but twitter is definitely becoming a big problem for me…usually what i do is i play some mobile games first thing in the morning instead of checking it so i don’t completely ruin my day but i spend way too much time checking twitter throughout the day anyway. it has gotten kind of annoying. it’s an important website to me because it’s really good for keeping up with artists i like and whatnot but maybe i should try to stop myself from checking it more than once or twice a day?

i dunno. i think it’s probably really bad for my focus and when i see something super terrible on it (which can happen at any time!) it ruins things for the next hour or two. so frustrating


#19

I infinitely prefer listening to music while looking out the window when on a bus. You get to see stuff and it can be nice and meditative.


#20

Twitter is the last one I still use and have installed. I’ve gotten rid of Facebook and Instagram–deleted my old posts, deactivated my accounts, deleted the apps. I’m torn about Twitter–I have Internet-only friends on there that I’d like to keep in touch with that way. I have groomed my feed to be free of as much toxic content as I can… though that’s a bit of a futile effort.

For me, the problem wasn’t the toxic nature of the posts or an obsession over them, but the way people use them to passively tell you what they’re up to without really directly maintaining any semblance of a meaningful relationship. Used to be if you were friends you’d call, text, spend actual time together. Now for people in my age group (30s/40s) it seems like everyone is just using Instagram stories to impress each other. It really sucks.

It feels good! If people want to talk to me then they have to actively engage with me now. If they did something fun, they can actually use their memory to remember it and tell me about it in person! And if they don’t really want to do that then I guess we weren’t that close to begin with and that’s fine!

A number of my friends are starting to realize this is a problem as well. I don’t think they’ll drop their accounts, but they’re all using them less often.