Are there any other military veterans that are big Waypoint fans?


#1

I did seven years in the army as an Intelligence Analyst for apaches. Video games have always been a huge part of my life and most of my fond memories in the service are things like playing Command & Conquer Generals in Iraq when we had down time between missions. How bout y’all?


#2

I was in the Navy for 5 years as an Air Traffic Controller. When on deployment on board the USS Enterprise, I and several others had our PSPs and played SOCOM ad-hoc LAN style between flight ops. The PSP was a fantastic portable, with which I could play games, watch movies, look at pictures of my family and even browse the web. I put Velcro on the back and on the top of my bunk for movie/show watching. Awesome!


#3

Oh and also everywhere I was stationed, I started up Halo lan tournaments and parties. One of my fondest memories was in A school in the barracks, setting up consoles and TV’s and everyone going crazy with several buildings worth of sailors and Marines in the break area shouting and cheering our halo tournaments. We ordered tons of pizza and played all weekend. Surprisingly, our officers and superiors we’re totally cool with it as long as it didn’t interfere with our duties.


#4

We used to do the same thing with Monster Hunter. RIP the PSP.


#5

Legally considered a veteran, though I only did a month in Navy boot camp. I was denied the security clearance I needed to do my job because I have friends in foreign countries. Didn’t like anything else that was available to me (I couldn’t pass the Navy’s color perception test which greatly limited what was available to me) so I bounced out of there. It was a very bizarre month. I was only in training for about two weeks. The last two were spent in the purgatory of military separations, where you get to watch movies and read all day while still being in uniform and getting yelled at for being too loud. Met some extraordinary people in there, for better or worse, and I still think about many of them quite often. Living with 200 other guys who have also had their careers fall through… it’s a unique environment.