Can Means TV facilitate the change it aims to bring to streaming media?

So I’ve been stumbling over content by Means TV all over the place lately. I think their approach is very commendable, giving space and a voice to marginalized folks, delivering focused capitalist critiques and thought-through takes on a flat hierarchical basis.

I just wonder: Will it be enough? As it stands now, they’ve only funded 20% of their first year of programming. Of course it’s a harder sell when you aim to provide content for people on the margins who may not have the spare change to support such a cause, and with the money not being tax deductible even morally, ecologically and philosophically sound companies might hesitate to throw a few bucks their way.

What do you think about this venture? Too radical to attract enough attention? Still too far ahead of its time to gain meaningful traction?

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I think MeansTV is good and necessary tbh. Most of the content they’ve put up on their YouTube has been good. It bums me out that they’re not going to get the funding they need, but my hope is the project can still carry on even at a smaller scale than they’d hoped.

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The accepted reality is that most online video content produced independently was produced for free, with the wish that it may generate money should it go viral. Means TV starting out with the upfront expectation of getting paid what is, comparably, a lot of money, is as much the point as the content itself.

One of the founders was on Chapo talking about the platform a month or two ago, and they are very aware of the likelihood of raising the amount of money they are asking for. It doesn’t stop them from asking, though, because it’s important to be realistic about the cost of video production labor; the act of asking is itself communicating the platform’s message.

I’m sure there are contingencies should they fail to meet their goal, and I’d bet that, to some extent, they half expect not to meet it. I hope they are able to sustain themselves, but you are right: a large part of their already-converted audience is poor. I wonder how this will shake out.

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and with the money not being tax deductible even morally, ecologically and philosophically sound companies might hesitate to throw a few bucks their way.

And who are those companies supposed to be? Isn’t that statement already contradictory?

Definitely no multinationals and bigger ones, sure. I was more thinking local, small shops, initiatives, craftspeople, even freelancers etc. burdened by taxes and alleviating that by donating and deducting.