Cheating in singleplayer games


#41

for some reason i thought i made a post in this thread already, but i hadn’t.

anyway, cheating in singleplayer games doesn’t exist. it’s not real. from a financial standpoint, paying money for a game only to hit a point where it gets unfun to play and so you drop it is a waste of money. from a time management standpoint, devoting a significant amount of time to a video game only to hit a wall and drop it b/c you don’t think you can progress is also a waste. these are arguments you could make for cheats that are “logical” but they are also boring.

the meat of it is that we play games to be entertained in some way. what that means is different for everyone. that’s why they’re game are games. if a game isn’t fun for you or engaging you on a level you find rewarding, then modifying it so that it can do that isn’t something to be ashamed of anymore than using accessibility options or setting the game to easy mode is.

i reiterate, the concept of “cheating” in a singleplayer game is the fakest shit ever.


#42

Oh wow yeah, big mood. I wish we would retire the concept of bosses. Especially the traditionally setup where you hop around on platforms or dash from corner to corner while unloading bursts of attacks into a large creature with ridiculous amounts of HP, or character that transforms into different forms.


#43

Conversely, I’ve found games where basically the only bit I liked were the bosses. (Shovel Knight, for me, was a lot of difficult, horribly unforgiving platforming in levels, followed by, for the first three bosses (the only ones I got to), some actually interesting single-screen classic boss fights with patterns and everything. If they’d removed the platforming and just had the bosses, I might have actually been interested in trying to finish it…)


#44

I think there are good ways to do boss battles, and bad ways to do boss battles.

As much as I like the Soul’s style of gameplay and really enjoy the series, I dislike the bosses only because they seem to be where the system “breaks” for the lack of a better term. They seem to mostly fall into two separate categories; the gimmick fight with an incredibly easy exploit you just need to stumble on or the regular enemy with a huge health bar. Neither of them are all that much fun. Gimmick fights are boring because they present no real challenge and in a game designed specifically on community sharing of information the trick is basically just handed to you. The regular enemy style bosses aren’t that much fun because they give you so little time to actually understand their pattern and it’s a chore to get to them making repeat practice frustrating. If the checkpoint was outside the chamber, it would be much less of a time suck to learn the necessary skills to win, but it’s a slog just to get there and you’ve got so little time to reflect on what the game is trying to teach you.

I think you can have big boss fights, and design them in ways that are less punishing so you can actively learn from them how to use your current skill set in a new challenge without being pushed face first into the grindstone. Some games manage to make a boss just kind of feel like yet another level or stage, you just happen to be focusing on one really big enemy as opposed to lots of smaller ones.


#45

I’m okay with bosses, but I love the idea of a bizarro Cuphead. Surely there have been some games that have done this by now?