‘Cyanide & Happiness’ Ditched Kickstarter Over NFTs, And Fans Came With

Few hobbies have benefited more from the rise of crowdfunding than tabletop games. Board games, card games, dice games—you name it, it’s raised a ton of money via crowdfunding, and most likely that money was raised through Kickstarter. But in December 2021, the popular crowdfunding website announced it would, for reasons still unclear, move Kickstarter to the blockchain to “create a decentralized version of Kickstarter’s core functionality.” 


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/m7vnmb/cyanide-and-happiness-ditched-kickstarter-over-nfts-and-fans-came-with

I don’t think it can be understated how large of a market share Kickstarter has on the crowdfunding scene. I’m willing to bet the vast majority of campaigns on Kickstarter would never ever get funding if they weren’t there. Only bigger operations are going to be able to break away while still getting the funding they’re aiming for. While I totally support and advocate for Explosm’s choice here, even if I outgrew their milieu years ago. I just wish more independent creators had the resources to be able to leave Kickstarter behind, too.

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As someone who doesn’t use and has never backed anything on Kickstarter why is that? What makes Kickstarter more special then say Indiegogo or a website with one of the dozen different payment processing platforms? Does Kickstarter get a lot of people just actively browsing it?

I have read Kickstarter’s statement about the move to blockchain numerous time over the months since it was announce and despite being reasonably well educated on the subject I have no goddamn idea what any of it means.

Yep. Audience size. That’s really the main reason.

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I don’t know if they were first (I think they were first) but they are certainly the biggest, particularly for projects that have rewards.