Do you ever keep diaries or journals of you adventures in game?


#1

After a torrent of news and youtube articles highlighting recent updates to Elite Dangerous (The good, the bad and the ugly) I decided I’d return to game that in hindsight left me a little bitter by the time i hit the 700th hour mark. Diving in I was searching for something online to do with the game when i stumbled upon an old set of journal entries I’d made back in 2016; Daily notes of my adventures told a slightly more upbeat mood to my endless grind and made me question “was it all that bad afterall?”

This was not the first game i’d made a diary for; MXO (The matrix online for you blue pills out there), a game near and dear to at least (well just) one of the waypoint crew also had a few hundred posts (now purged by the Architect, along with the game) but made me wonder if anyone else did the same.

I’ll pop a link to the elite journal here just in case you are curious, but with no obligation to take a look (based on the view counts it was never that popular)

http://elite-journal.blogspot.co.uk/


#2

I love this idea and I want to start doing this… I used to do detailed game-by-game logs of my assorted Franchise/Dynasty modes in assorted sports games, which is kind of like that. Your journal is fascinating! I love when people create things like this through games


#3

I used to write up my RPG characters’ stories as faux-historical accounts after finishing the games, but recently switched to obsessive screencapping of major moments. I do enjoy reading a good chronicle, though!


#4

I sort of do. What I do is catalog every time I play a game, when I play it, and usually my immediate thoughts of it after that session. You can see my 2018 list here. But I also have a spreadsheet that isn’t public yet.
I started doing this most because I wanted to take part in Giant Bomb’s GOTY stuff, but would often forget what games I played through out the year. Now that I plan to track my gaming habits for a few years (so far I think this is the 5th) and see how they change. Eventually I may even write up something about it.

It’s fun!


#5

I think my closest was the book of grudges, while playing a dwarf in Warhammer Online.

Wrote down the time/day, character name, and offense, and if I saw them in an area I could fight them in, I went after them above other better targets. …Somewhere on the RP scale I guess. Not exactly a journal.


#6

A while back on a different forum I participated in a sort of round-robin Minecraft game where we’d send a save file around and each person had a week to explore and build. At the end of the week you’d pass the save onto the next person in the sequence and post a journal entry of our time on the frontier.

It was an interesting experience. I think the social aspect of it probably made it more compelling than the times I have tried to keep a personal journal.


#7

I remember writing a round-robin form of fan fiction, where each author would get a set number of words, and time to add to the story. Feels similar to this, although in a different format.

Also a great way to play minecraft!


#8

That’s an exceptionally dwarf way to live (in the warhammer universe) kudos! Also remind me to never get on your bad side (virtually speaking!)


#9

I used to be really into roleplaying in Skyrim, so once or twice I wrote out my character’s backstory when I created them, and then continued writing their story as I played through the game. Kind of a silly thing to do, but it helped me connect with the character and it honestly wasn’t the worst stuff I’ve ever written. I like writing fantasy stuff, but i’m not really interested in defining a whole world, so it was nice to write a story in an existing world with strict limitations (I could only do things that were in the game). It helped get comfortable with my writing style, which was nice at the time. I think that’s what attracts some people to fanfiction; it lets you skip a lot of the foundational stuff of building worlds and characters and focus on specific relationships or moments.


#10

Just wanna shout out Waypoint contributor and personal friend Janine Hawkins’ 2017 game journal here! It’s so rad, because on top of a little note about whatever she’s played, there’s a great drawing that goes along with it!


#11

I haven’t done this exactly, but I do a couple of similar things.

With puzzle games, I’ll often keep a notes journal, but I suppose that may not be terribly out of the ordinary. Say games like Her Story or The Witness.

Perhaps more relevant, I will totally write in-game, in-fiction journal entries if the game lets me. Pillars of Eternity, for example, allows you to write your own notes and formats them to the same journal-entry style as other entries created by the game. When I would leave an area without having fully explored it, or having turned back because of an overpowered challenge, or a curious puzzle I hadn’t figured out—or even just because of something I did that was super interesting—I would write an entry as though it was my character journaling about the location/quest/etc. within the world. I would even go back and write a concluding entry if I cleaned up whatever task it was that had left the area open and spurred me to write the entry in the first place.

Also, even slightly more afield from your original question, I love when a game lets me write my own fiction to fill into the game beyond notes—creating new Stellaris civilizations with massive overly-thought-out backgrounds (based on the mechanics I’ve chosen in creating it) that exceed the UI window size is my jam.


#12

I’ve done the SAME exact thing with my Final Fantasy XI and XIV characters. You’re absolutely right, having a pre-established world to write in really lets you focus on the characters and create moments instead of world building, etc. Glad to see I wasn’t alone in doing this!

Similarly, back in my Final Fantasy XI days, I used to keep a sort out “in-character” journal of the major goals / story stuff that would happen in the game. It was fun to keep a chronicle of the things I got up to there while also being able to get a little creative writing going by keeping it in my character’s voice.