Games you were okay with being cancelled


#1

I suspect that probably most of these will turn out to be sequels that weren’t shaping up to be good, but I’m curious, is there any game you’re actually a little relieved never saw the light of day? Any currently in the works that you worry might be better off buried, even if you’d prefer they came out good?

I don’t feel that way very often about games. I think games are generally better out than in, and it’s hard to see people’s work buried. But then again…


#2

The original Doom 4 was gonna end in tears.

My tears


#3

I don’t think I even knew about that one.


#4

I’m not GLAD it got cancelled necessarily, but when Silent Hills was at its peak hype Hideo Kojima, Guillermo Del Toro AND Junjo Ito were involved??? That was either gonna be the DOPEST or fail SUPER hard, and I don’t want to think about diehard SH fans having their hopes dashed that hard after they had probably all but given up hope before PT came along. Plus PT was a great game, but the full version would have to be very different for a full-priced long-form game experience, so even that demo isn’t necessarily an indicator of what it would’ve been. So like…I definitely wanted to see what Silent Hills was gonna be? But ALSO this could have been another classic Kojima joint where “Yeah this is OKAY but it didn’t have the budget/schedule for it to be fully developed into whatever Kojima’s full insane vision was.” So basically another MGSV.

Like I guess what I’m saying is, if it failed it would have disappointed a lot of people. Someone out there just make another good Silent Hill game please, even if it’s not Silent Hill…Unless old Team Silent veterans try to Kickstart a new-IP copycat. I’m done with those crowdfunded nostalgia games tbh. The more of those games that get released the more the success/fail rate of them makes me go Hmmmm…


#5

Oh, yeah. Bit off topic maybe, but I find the whole crowdfunding pitch approach of ‘remember the old days? when games were good??’ approach super off-putting.


#6

Thrill Kill. It was actually very, very bad.


#7

Maverick Hunter and Mega Man Universe are both projects I’m happy were cancelled in the wake of Inafune’s departure from Capcom. Gritty reboots of games that were already gritty reboots are the worst and I’m glad Mighty No. 9 landed on the bad 2.5D game grenade instead of Mega Man himself having another bad game added to his legacy.


#8

Its really off-putting when when its entirely disingenuous.The Double Fine kickstarter was going to ‘resurrect’ the adventure game, Project Phoenix is going to ‘save’ the JRPG.

Neither of those genres were/are in need of saving.


#9

Half Life 3.

*crowdsurfs out of the thread *


#10

Hmm. Still Off-topic but it’s my topic so I’ll indulge… I don’t think that’s quite fair about the Double Fine kickstarter. (Disclaimer: I am friendly with a few people at Double Fine and am a moderator on the Double Fine forums)

The pitch for the Double Fine’s kickstarter was mainly that Tim Schafer used to get asked to make adventure games a lot (which was true), and that he hadn’t done so in a while and that people might want to fund that and get a documentary with it. There was no ‘remember when these games were good’ nonsense, though there was a little ‘these games don’t get made as much any more’, which while not the whole story, was more or less true. (There’s an argument to be made about whether the genre has simply moved on from its roots, but that is actually quite well explored in the documentary). Also, there was an emphasis on not making it a museum piece, that ran throughout the campaign.

On the other hand, I DID get put off a lot by the Thimbleweed Park kickstarter, which traded a lot on nostalgia, and also on what I think is RG’s mistaken believe that he is the one true saviour of the adventure game, and all the ‘remember when these games were good’ stuff. I have a lot of respect for him, because I think he genuinely advanced the genre in important ways, but he frustrates me with this stuff.


#11

MMUniverse was more like a proto-Mario Maker. And Mario Maker is life.


#12

It’s quite possible I’m misremembering the tone of the actual campaign.

I just remember a whole lot of ‘Adventure games are back!’ sentiments in the press surrounding the kickstarter, and thinking boy, aren’t half the games on steam some kind of adventure game?


#13

I will say there was a bit of, in the video, ‘let’s bring adventure games back’ but it was more about ‘I haven’t made one of those in a while.’ There was even a joke in the video about Germany being one of the last bastions of those old school adventures as a popular genre (which is true enough, search for a Let’s Play of any old LucasArts game on youtube and you’ll see dozens of German streamers, and Germany is a place where a lot of old style adventures still get made)

And the reporting around it was definitely more ‘adventures are back!’ because that was the simpler thing to report than ‘adventure games changed, mostly, except when they didn’t, and anyway this person who made some good ones is making another one’.

But they led with: this is going to be an adventure game, other than that, we don’t know, we’re going to film the whole thing and see what happens, and we want it to be a new game, based on this cool art style we have in mind not just a pure throwback.

In fact, I remember on the forums a lot of people complaining that it couldn’t really be truly old school unless it had pixelly graphics and all that. Later I asked one of the staff if they ever regretted using the word ‘old school’ in the campaign as it means so many different things to different people, and they said yeah, that might’ve been a mistake in hindsight.

In an attempt to drag this back on topic a bit:

While I don’t really want to see a kickstarter fail, usually, I’m a little relieved the Dizzy one didn’t go anywhere. While I have some kinda fond memories of those games, I really don’t know that we need another, new one.


#14

Yeah I think history can keep Dizzy the egg. I did feel bad for them given the publics complete indefference to the campaign, even thought I was complicit in it.


#15

Starcraft: Ghost. I was just thinking about this the other day. When that game was announced, there was general confusion and some anger at the fact that Blizzard was going to release a Starcraft game for a console audience, an audience that generally had little to no experience with the Starcraft series. I remember PC Gamer announced it in article headlined “Blizzard Goes Bonkers.” Mind you, this was back in the day before the XBox 360 when PC games were still pretty far away from console games, mainly in the way they played. This was the era before you could play every PC game with dual analog controls. Not only that, but i just felt somewhat out of pocket for Blizzard to attempt basically a Splinter Cell game in the universe of an RTS game. Of course, now that we know Blizzard also attempted Warcraft Adventures, a game with probably had similar ambitions to SC: Ghost, this makes more sense. Still the project seemed doomed from the start. Starcraft: Ghost was always a game that seemed to me really interesting but probably one which, if released, would amount to a thoroughly mediocre project that would stain the Starcraft brand.


#16

I legitimately forgot it was going to have a level maker component. I still think it was a good thing the game was cancelled as what they presented looked like some ramshackle Dreamcast game.

I’d be down for Capcom giving it another go and wholesale lifting what Mario Maker is using the 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit Mega Man palettes.


#17

Brothers in Arms: Furious 4.

As a teen and a history enthusiast, I absolutely adored the Brothers in Arms series when it debuted in 2005. The first two games are hard as nails WWII squad based tactical shooters where a single bad move can wipe your entire squad. It’s a game where with no regenerating health and if your squad members die they die for good and your lose them for the rest of the game.
Ubisoft professed to have poured hundreds of hours into research for the game and once bragged that several levels were based on the actual maps and sand tables of the battlefields and joked that if you played the game enough you could move to France and become a tour guide.
But more than that it had a squad that felt like a group of real people. Soldiers formed friendships, bickered and got genuinely nasty sometimes and it gave the game so much tension in and out of combat.
The third game is super hokey and isn’t as difficult and reflects that it was made in the Call of Duty era of WWII games.
Then in 2011 the trailer for Brothers in Arms: Furious 4 dropped and I was appalled.
Clearly someone at Ubisoft saw Inglorious Basterds and completely missed what that movie was saying about WWII and it looked like they were trying to turn Brothers in Arms into Borderlands. The premise seemed to be that 4 dudes were going to butcher their way through Europe and I wanted no part in that.
After a pretty huge backlash they separated it from the Brothers in Arms series and overhauled the game.
Then they cancelled it and I could not have been happier.
Great thread, @KestrelPi.


#18

I can’t imagine being happy that a game has been cancelled unless I had a sense that it would be culturally or personally destructive if released, or if it would enrich people with culturally or personally destructive motives.

Beyond that, I think it’s kinda tacky to be “happy” that a game gets cancelled.


#19

I tried to get a little into this in the first post, but this is not supposed to be about being gleeful that games weren’t made or work and effort was wasted or anything mean-spirited like that. More about games where, when looking back with hindsight, they were probably not going in a great direction.

So for example while that Full Throttle game I posted in the first post wouldn’t have been a disaster if it came out, I think it would have been a misstep, the trailer inspires no confidence that it understands the source material. It’s suggestive of an inauthentic follow up to a game that in some ways was about authenticity.

So I don’t think I’m being tacky when I suggest that dropping it was the right decision.


#20

I like the way you think. I’ll be content if HL3 never happens.