Is there a game that you are embarrassed to have ever liked?


#1

In 2018, I hate Grand Theft Auto V, it’s one of the most aggressively annoying things I’ve ever experienced. All the characters suck, R* still hasn’t figured out how to make the gta games feel good to play imo, it’s thematically incoherent and literally none of its comedy lands, which is incredible considering how big it is. I hate it, almost top to bottom.

In 2013, I loved it. I was there, with all the rest of them, going on about the brilliance of its portrayal of masculinity and capitalism, how insightful the torture scene was, how “funny” Trevor was(RIP Johnny K, you were done so wrong) and how it didn’t matter that you couldn’t permanently save cars in garages. I never engaged in any of the harassment that occurred during the initial backlash, but I was still nuts about the game. 17 year olds suck.

So, a pretty radical shift all told, and I’m still learning to not let hype get the better of me. Has anyone else had a similar experience?


#2

Naa, I value the initial experience of a game more than any feelings I develop in hindsight.

I did wish I could put pants on 2B while playing NieR Automata though. I liked NieR Automata and I don’t give a shit about her attire personally but she does make some ppl uncomfortable and I didn’t want to be judged and I wanted even less to explain.


#3

I don’t think so.
Why would I be embarrassed to have liked a game?


#4

I’m not embarrassed to have liked it but I liked BioShock Infinite when it came out.

Needless to say, after some thought, I no longer like BioShock Infinite.


#5

I also did not gush as much for GTA V when I replayed it last year. It’s still one of the most impressive games I’ve played in technical yerms but it also dawned on me that the Housers cannot write GTA. The characters are atrocious, the plot is nonsense and when the ‘humor’ isn’t utilizing stereotypes or ‘parody’, it’s kind of amazing how unfunny they are. (The scene where Michael chides Trevor for being a hipster comes to mind as one that surprisingly isn’t problematic but god is it five minutes of someone droning thinking they’re funny)

I can’t really think of a game I was embarrassed to have liked? There’s definitely some games that I lost fondness for over the years as I became more informed, but I’ll say the closest one is Persona 4. I still like that game a bunch but boy was I ever wrong for thinking that Kanji and Naoto’s arcs were good or progressive.


#6

I remain embarrassed that I genuinely enjoy HuniePop.

Thankfully, HunieCam Studio had absolutely none of the class of that game (I’m dead serious, I know what I just wrote) so I can rightfully despise that game.

But HuniePop…eh, it’s a guilty pleasure. Like, the things wrong with it are really obvious, but it also doesn’t come up nearly as often as you’d think (THOUGH WHEN THEY DO COME UP, SWEET CHRIST), leaving most of the game as an entertaining puzzle game with fun characters.

I am fully expecting the second game in development to be more HunieCam than HuniePop because they’re bringing back some of the stereotypes from that game and also one of the new characters is a Muslim woman who works airport security and is also a huge masochist.

So.

Yeah.

I don’t count Gender Bender DNA Twister Extreme because it gets so goddamn ridiculous that I just start awaiting what stupid new thing I’m about to be subjected to.


#7

I wouldn’t say I have games I’m embarrassed to have liked. Certainly there were games that I played as a kid that I would never go back to. But I’m accepting of the fact that there were external influences such as marketing, franchising, hype trains etc. that are especially influential on a kid. Eg. I was 12 when Force Unleashed came out and oh boy did I buy into the hype for that! And I genuinely enjoyed my time with it, I think. But then again I also enjoyed my time playing pretty much anything at that point.

So I’m not so hard on myself, more just sad that advertising had such an outsize effect on my taste. My parents don’t play games so retailers/advertisers could have a much bigger influence then they did in other media where my parents were more educated. Thankfully I had a friend whose Dad played games and they turned me on to some relatively sophisticated fare like Bioware RPGs which I would have never found until later otherwise.


#8

Have you ever liked a game directed by David Jaffe as a teen and then look at that same game again 10 years later?


#9

When I try to think of examples of media I am embarrassed to like, the closest I can come to is stuff I am embarrassed to have recommended to others. I’m not sure if the prompt of the OP is something significantly different.
There is plenty of stuff I like that is harmful and problematic, but I don’t feel embarrassment for liking those things. I’m just super fascinated in examining the reasoning of why I like those things. Maybe this is a method I use to avoid embarrassment? Analyzation?


#10

There are plenty of bad games I like, not ashamed of it. Deadly Premonition is easily top 5 of my favorite games ever and I need everyone to know it.


#11

You should never feel guilty for liking anything. If you can find or have found value in something, there is usually something worthwhile in there, even if it is not as charming or covered in blemishes or actually quite problematic.

That being said I played more Simpsons Hit & Run then is probably appropriate when I was young


#12

I’m a bit embarrassed about liking God of War III. I mean, I like it a lot.


#13

Heck yeah, Hit and Run rules. Me and my brother probably rented that out from Blockbuster at least a dozen times, although I don’t think we ever finished it.

To the topic at hand, I don’t really go back to games I’ve finished that often, and it’s hard for me to say how I feel about a game while being so far removed from playing it. There are some obvious things that stick out that my opinion has drastically changed towards even without revisiting, like GTA V and Bioshock Infinite, both of which I thought were amazing at the time but now that feeling has plummeted, to say the least (granted, I was a shitty sophomore in high school when they came out so I don’t think i fully understood why they were bad at the time). To try and make a deep pull from my childhood, one of the few games me and my brother had for the N64 was Donky Kong 64, which I thought was awesome, and frankly still don’t quite understand why it gets the hate that it does. I don’t know if I’m necessarily embarrassed for liking it so much, though, more surprised at the mainstream attitude that’s developed towards it over the years.


#14

I don’t know if this qualifies, but I have an unhealthy relationship with Master of Orion III. Which is to say, I know that it is a transhcan fire and possibly one of the worst 4x games ever made, but it comes across to me as having so much potential (the implementation of research is the closest any game has gotten to simulating what it’s like in real life!) that I reinstall it every year or so and put in another 6 or 8 hours before convincing myself that the game is, in fact, bad.


#15

Can you briefly describe the research system? I’ve never played Masters of Orion III but I’m very curious!


#16

yeah I play a lot of anime crap and while stuff like that kind of doesn’t register thanks to being corrupted by the medium, I do wish a lot of stuff like that would chill for a second so I could explain the merit of stuff I like without having to have this awkwardness upfront


#17

Like, it’s okay to be embarrassed over things? It’s not a crime to look back on something and feel embarrassed over something you missed at the time that makes you no longer like the thing. Don’t beat yourself up over it or anything there’s no point in that but there’s nothing wrong with feeling embarrassed that you missed how something advocates for something awful. Examine the thing that makes you feel that way and what that means for how you feel about and and how you should talk about it and move on. If you still feel embarrassed or guilty or whatever that’s fine if you don’t that’s fine to! It’s perfectly fine to be embarrassed to still watch Woody Alien movies or some old cartoon that existed only to sell child you toys or whatever it’s an emotion like any other and can be a perfectly valid way to feel

Also I really liked BioShock: Infinite when I first played it and WOOF. Also there was a time when I thought Sonic Adventure 2 had a good story and it does not in anyway so there are my submissions


#18

I played a ton of Clash of Clans and I’m honestly just sort of embarrassed at how much time I spent with something so shamelessly exploitative and predatory with its in-game purchases. It’s such a polished well made little thing though and it’s a shame it had to be kinda gross with its business model. Secretly a bit proud of myself for never spending any money on it though, really stuck it to those guys I’m sure Supercell nearly went broke without my contributions


#19

definitely mini metro, a simulation game where you map out subway systems, but not because it’s a bad game or there’s anything questionable (that i know of) about the devs – mostly because i am just absolutely horrible at building subway systems, but back when i played it a lot, i thought i was really, really good.

i look back now at maps i thought were smart and i’m just blown away at my own galaxy brain bullshit. i have no idea what i was doing or why i thought any human being could ride those lines. i’m so glad i’m not an architect


#20

There’s no one game that I feel embarrassed for enjoying, bar Bioshock Infinite because 19 year old me was a dumb ass.

I’m more embarrassed by the things I consistently gravitate towards in games: the kinaesthetics of first person shooters, weapon customisation, choreographed violence etc. The martial aesthetics of fascism poke at my weird problematic pleasure centres. I constantly feel icky at how meticulously I curate a loadout in every shooter I play.

You don’t have to feel bad about being embarrassed something, but I genuinely dislike what these kinds of games bring out in me.