Kyoto Animation arson attack

This was being discussed in the anime thread, but this is definitely something that deserves its own thread due to the gravity of this tragedy.

CW for descriptions of violence and the aftermath of the fire:

For those who want to know more about the studio, Sakugablog did a good article about their history last year:

Please try not to speculate about the attack. And though it may be best to wait to donate until there’s confirmation of that Kyoto Animation will accept the money, Sentai Filmworks has set up a fundraiser to help the victims. It is also possible to support the studio directly by buying digital goods such as wallpapers from their store, here’s a guide on how to do that.

Update: KyoAni now also accepts donations directly. I imagine this also means that they’ll accept Sentai’s fundraiser. Also, while they do accept payments from overseas, keep in mind that those likely include heavy fees.

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Holy shit, that’s awful.

The studio is known for paying its animators a regular salary, breaking with the industry’s standard of paying per frame - which is seen as putting extreme pressure on staff.

I did not know this. We already know Japanese animators get a shit deal when it comes to compensation and worker rights. Why did the one almost nice studio get hit with this?

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I saw this idea going around Twitter and Reddit yesterday, and… is that a thing? I’ve honestly never heard of this before as a way to offer “support.”

I get that by buying digital goods directly from the studio store, you aren’t paying a middle man or creating work that needs to be fulfilled. But you’re still just putting money into the same corporate coffers that you would’ve last week or last year. Is there any reason to believe that money will be funneled to the victims or their families?

I know there are still questions about the Sentai fundraiser, but they have at least pledged to “establish the most direct bridge to delivering this aid to affected KyoAni staff and their families.”

…so, you’re arguing that supporting the gofundme created by a different company seems more legit than directly giving the affected company, with a history of treating their employees well and fairly, who understand how important their staff truly is to their success?

Buying from KyoAni goes directly to KyoAni. It’s what they themselves have said is a way you can support them right now. They are the affected party. This fire targeted KyoAni. Buying from them directly is their way of crowdfunding monetary aid.

It’s notable because the goods are digital. Buying them does not force more work upon the staff, who clearly can’t ship out physical goods right now for obvious reasons. Management thought through this through so as not to disrupt their affected and grieving employees and their families.

I’m not arguing one way or another, I have just literally never seen this as a supposed way to support victims of a tragedy like this before.

So this came from KyoAni themselves? Everything I had seen, including the link in the OP, was fans offering it up as an option. If so, it would certainly sway me somewhat, but I’m a little flustered here.

I have way more thoughts on this, but I don’t want to derail this thread, so I’ll drop it. Obviously, people who want to support the victims should do so in whatever way they feel is appropriate.

What an absolute horror. My heart goes out to everyone affected by this.

I would like to remind everyone not to fixate on the perp.

Part of what he wants is fame, for people to remember him because of this horrible act he did. Don’t name him, don’t fixate on his reasons. He doesn’t deserve that attention because the truth is obvious and pathetic: he was desperate for validation and instead of dealing with his self-worth issues, he decided to do the most cowardly thing imaginable.

Please stay focused on the victims of the fire and how to help them.

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I know I’m preaching to the choir, but worth mentioning: tragedies such like this don’t justify using abelist language in reference to the attacker. All that does is create further stigma against others who are often targeted with such language.

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Here’s a couple of pieces by Nick Creamer of ANN, about the strengths of the studio, and a rundown of some of their best works:

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/feature/2015-12-02/what-makes-kyoto-animation-so-special/.95559

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/feature/2018-01-03/a-journey-through-kyoto-animation/.123755

I don’t really know how to fully process this, having nearly an entire team of creatives that you follow suddenly disappear for no good reason. It’s even worse knowing that the studio may not recover from this, considering how many of the remaining survivors might have suffered permanent injuries that would prevent them from continuing to work in this industry.

If that’s the case, then the best possible outcome is that the legacy of this studio’s work will inspire more diverse creative voices to push into the anime industry, and for the industry in turn to strive towards the better working conditions they were known for.

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At the risk of sounding callous, KyoAni was a 200 person studio with a strong culture of in-house training. This is far from the end of the studio, so the attacker failed in this regard.

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KyoAni’s has started accepting donations directly:

I imagine this means they’ll accept Sentai’s fundraiser as well. Also, while they do accept payments from overseas, note that this will likely include heavy fees.