Only Big Games Like 'Cyberpunk 2077' Can Show Dick on Twitch

Cyberpunk 2077 is full of dicks. From the character creation screen to the streets of Night City, the new roleplaying game constantly attempts to shock the player with sexual imagery. It’s the kind of overwhelming sexualization that would get a game banned from Twitch if it weren’t also one of the biggest games of the year.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/m7a37n/only-big-games-like-cyberpunk-2077-can-show-dick-on-twitch

It’s a little “wow, a big company having a double standard that lets them make exceptions to the rules for other big companies, I’m shocked,” but it is a little tiring that this game - which has full titty out if you so much as want to change your character’s nail polish - is A-OK given some of the games that can’t be streamed.

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Oh please. This article is so disingenuous it hurts.

It’s correct to say that Twitch has inconsistent rules and that these rules side with big names/money over smaller ones. Yes. Absolutely.

But to say that Cyberpunk is about nudity is like saying that the Cheesecake factory is about spring rolls. They exist. You can order them, and you will even see other people ordering them, but it is so far from the norm that it’s painful. The game DOES have sexualized bodies, and there are even some huge problems with how they do that, but non-nude sexualized bodies are not the same as a sex game. The ability to see nudity in the game…and then basically never seeing it, where the point of the game is very much not focused on sex (even the sex scenes are nearly free of nudity), but on the dystopia, is a far cry from how it is being presented here. Cobra Club is a fun game and a thoughtful piece, but it’s essentially made entirely of dicks, and is about hooking up through and through. Cyberpunk is about shooting people and driving your car around. Comparing a game that HAS nudity, but is mostly about violence (we could have a conversation about that) to a game that is completely centered around nudity and then saying they’re treated differently is so hilarious it hurts.

Why can’t we have a conversation about double standards that aren’t rooted in a completely absurd examples that undermine themselves from the start?

As a counterpoint, Cyberpunk uses its sexualisation titilate players, and was featured heavily in the marketing. Add to this CDPR’s history, going back to the sex cards of Witcher 1 (which is still allowed on twitch), and it’s hard to see positive intent with this.

Meanwhile, Cobra Club’s use of genitals is in service of a message about privacy and gay expression, and are presented in such a way as to resist sexualisation. While I might agree that the two are hardly a fitting comparison, my conclusion would definitely not be in Cyberpunk’s favour.

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I’d also point out that older ‘big’ games, ones too old for SEO/high traffic guarantees, with AO-rated versions that are mostly not about sex (GTA:SA, Indigo Prophecy) are also banned on Twitch. So it’s not like ‘not being about sex’ is a consistent exception.

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I don’t think it is even arguable that you’re wrong about Cobra Club, but I think that the characterization of nudity in cyberpunk being about titilation is. Nudity in the game is literally a blank doll in the customization screen, if you’re a weirdo who takes their clothes off in your equipment screen, or on dead bodies. Sex scenes are surprisingly covered up.

While there is certainly plenty of sexuality, and there is definitely titilation, Twitch’s rules have never banned any sort of sexuality. When they address playing games with nudity, they only ban user-generated additions and explicit depictions and games that focus around nudity/sex/other “as a core focus or feature.” Again, Cyberpunk HAS nudity, but to argue that it is a core focus or feature is to delude yourself.

And ricotta: they have banned ALL AO rated games, even ones not focused around sexual content. That’s not an inconsistency.

I would like to point out again that I think that Twitch’s policies aren’t good, and I’m not in support of them, and ALSO that they are inconsistent when it comes to how they enforce these silly policies. It’s VERY MUCH worth examining this and calling it out. A game that has dicks as a central focus, however, is not a useful comparison and it is wildly disingenuous to try and say that treating them differently is, in and of itself, an example of that.