Roguelike Recommendations


#61

Seconded. I played a ton of Dungeons of Dredmor when it came out. Lots of fun and discoverable depth. Totally enjoyable.


#62

Chalk me up as another proponent of te4/ToME/Tales of Maj’Eyal. I will note in advance that I’m not sure if I’d call it just a straight up roguelike - it’s more like a roguelike and old school indie RPG had a baby. The default is adventure mode, which has lives instead of straight up one death that’s it, and it uses pretty standard cRPG class and talent system rather then open ended skills which a lot of more traditional roguelikes use; likewise, it has no grinding (enemies do not respawn), no food meter, and almost no consumables - the game is very cooldown based across a turn based combat system. So, yeah, not really a full blown stereotypical PC roguelike. That said the classes are pretty dang creative, there’s a TON of content, and, believe it or not for a roguelike, the setting is generally Pretty Baller and there’s a lot to learn and discover about it. Also, it has an in-game chat server, which is…USUALLY a blessing, as you can ask for help in real time, and occasionally a curse, as, while the community is usually pretty legit, it still has it’s ugly sides that rear up from time to time.


#63

I was going to recommend Dungeon of the Endless and was surprised that it didn’t have more mentions. How maddening to get six or eight levels in and make a mistake! Or just not find any dust to power new rooms and watch your carefully planned territory fall. There’s also just a ton of character in the rooms, equipment/items, and … characters. Probably one of my favorite games of the past few years.

Also, the mobile version plays really well. I’ve spent a good chunk of several cross-country flights with it.

(Like you I’m going to go check out Brogue right away, too.)


#64

I can cosign this, because this is the only thing that has stopped me from looking at this game for more than 30 seconds before deciding not to buy it, despite hearing so many amazing things about it, which is a bummer.

Maybe I prefer old ASCII-art roguelike games because boy howdy has art style been a toughie for this scene to crack.


#65

Honestly, it’s totally just the art style (not the level of detail/resolution) in Dungeons of Dredmor that SUCKS. I feel like they were going for a really silly “dinosaur RAWR” type of aesthetic that just didn’t click with a lot of people (a lot of the skill trees are similar in nature as well, though I don’t mind the theme as much as the style).

I put about 40-50 hours into nevertheless because it’s a fun, deep enough game with good systems. But yeah, the art style is actively cringeworthy.


#66

Welp, no I’m gonna have to check that out. I had no idea he made another roguelike.


#67

Does Sunless Sea count as a roguelike? I picked it up on sale this winter and played the heck out of it.


#68

I would say, totally yes. What’s your experience like with the replay value? I wasn’t sure how much text there was in the game, or if it’s still interesting once you’ve read most of it.


#69

Sunless Sea is deffo a roguelike.


#70

There’s a lot of text in the game, and actually the worst part of playing it was the font rendering. Some of the text was hard to read (I don’t know if this was specific to my Mac, or a general problem) either because it was very small or it actually rendered a little fuzzy.

That said, the semi-random world construction is pretty replayable, but maybe not as deeply replayable as other rogue likes. The story will unfold in different ways on replays, so while some chunks of it will be familiar, others will be new or will produce different paths, even if you’re already somewhat familiar with the events of a specific island/encounter.


#71

Shiren the Wanderer for SNES and DS is one of the few Roguelikes that I’ve really latched onto. I played more JRPGs than CRPGs growing up so the Nintendo-style pixel art appealed to me more. I will also say the Pokemon Mystery Dungeon games are underrated if that universe interests you at all?


#72

I recently played through Roguelight which is pay what you want on itch.io

It’s about falling through a dark cave and lighting it up with fire arrows. There are permanent upgrades you can buy after every death and it’s pretty short so it’s a really chill roguelike overall.


#73

UPDATE: in Ruin of the Reckless I finally got an ability setup that clicked and it was great. there are things about this game I’d change given the chance but I definitely feel like I understand it now and it’s pretty neat!

EDIT: (my main sticking points are that less buttons are more in my book, and that shops and consumables in games like this don’t do anything for me [also if you’re playing it and curious the combo was Agility + Rapier Soul, which let me just sort of pierce through packs of enemies before they could react])

If y’all want a rogue-ish procedural arcade action game I… still recommend Nuclear Throne. but if you want that but predominately melee and with more buttons, def check this thing out


#74

I’ve been trying to find a mobile roguelike that’s LIKE Nethack in terms of like “the devs thought of everything” but not as… Obtuse? And kinda hard to look at? And I feel like it probably doesn’t exist but if it does let me know


#75

I regularly play in the mornings and right before I sleep either Tales of Maj Eyal, Dungeonmans, Unexplored or Enter the Gungeon–the title depends on what mood I’m in. I’ve ascended DC:SS several years ago, and I haven’t checked on the new versions as I feel that it demands a good chunk of time investment to play again. I finished Nethack, too, but this was more than a decade ago via save scumming. I feel the concept of Nethack is good, but to play it without spoilers ends up being too much of a grind (you have to spam oracle advice and take note of all the information). I think Ancient Domains of Mystery might be the more refined version of Nethack, although I have never played it. The relatively recent paid version of the game makes me interested though.

Hoplite is a fun mobile roguelike that everyone should download, though.


#76

Resurrecting this excellent thread for another run through the dungeon of roguelike recommendations (lol).

But seriously, I’ve been a massive roguelike fan for ages. Unexplored would probably my favorite roguelike most recently, and I’ve had tons of fun with 868-HACK, Card Thief, and Wayward Souls. Does Out There count? I think it should. Oh, and Sword of The Stars: The Pit sucked up MANY hours of my life. Riptale is wickedly hard, but so much fun once you get the hang of it. I could go on.

So, yeah, I love roguelikes. I love them so much that I’ve decided to try making my own. It’s just a modest prototype right now, but it’s got a little bit of depth so far and is easily playable in your browser. If you’ve got 10 or 15 minutes to spare, maybe check it out!


#77

It definitely feels like Roguelight needs another shout in this thread. It’s very, uh, light in tone for a game about descending into a dark abyss, and it’s a perfect entry point in the genre for the uninitiated, since it’s as complex (mechanically speaking) as your average Game Boy game.

The main problem I run into when I try to get people into the genre is that the premise of restarting the game from point A again after death sounds discouraging and masochistic. They tend to run away from these games after hearing that, so it’s very nice to see someone understand the structure of the game and click with it in 5-10 minutes.

Also, I’m writing down tons of recs from this thread (there’s a roguelike Doom mod?) for when I’m done with Enter the Gungeon, so thank you all!