Share your games writing/criticism!


#61

Hey guys, latest article is up, and is here: http://www.wygamer.com/blog/living-with-imposter-syndrome. Did try to freelance that to waypoint…didn’t go so well! :blush:

Also I forgot to say I also have written for beefjack magazine back when that existed and thisismyjoystick.com if anyone heard of it?


#62

My site is a media catchall, so it’s not just limited to games, but here’s the game section of my website Creative Criticism.


#63

I wrote about how the PS2 game Duel Masters uses ambient music instead of the traditional music you hear in other trading card game video games. I can’t recall many other games in the genre that do this?


#64

I’m not huge on reviewing games, but understand they’re necessary in the industry. That being said, here’s my review of What Remains of Edith Finch.


#65

I definitely need to check this game out but by the time I do I know it will be old as hell. Nice review. Can you explain the “pie piece” rating system?


#66

Bumped my YouTube earlier but as far as some quick writing samples here are my favorites:

Severed: My First Time As A Lead Character Who Looks Like Me, for NerdMuch
and
Fuckboys in Gaming History: Warren Graham Life is Strange ; for my own blog


#67

Yeah totally!

So, you can see our statement here.

TLDR: while we really want our readers to default to the text of our reviews primarily, we also understand that many (read: most) people want to see a review score. That being said, we find a numerical value way too reductive. It compresses meaning in to something that doesn’t have a gray area. As well, even though we’re still small, we don’t want to contribute to Metacritic culture, where people’s jobs hang in the balance based on aggregate scoring.

Essentially, we want our pie charts to reflect a sort of "ehhh, it’s somewhere in the 7’s? ish? So for my review of Edith Finch, it’s kinda like an 8.5 or so?

Before launching, we originally had a far more complex system that included an actual gray area in the pie chart, that would reflect “on a good day, it’s this. On a bad day, it’s that.” But it seemed kind of overly obtuse.

Thanks for asking!


#68

Thanks for the info. I’ve never seen anything like that; definitely interesting… I wish ya’ll had more quickhits! though I can see how daily is a pretty lofty goal.


#69

Actually, thank you for the feedback! It’s not so much that it wasn’t doable (I have a good amount of down time at work) but mostly that I felt it sort of diluted our writing - that if somebody stumbled upon the site they might not really understand what we’re going for.

That being said, getting two full articles out a week is tough solo (my partners do more behind the scenes stuff, not much writing) so the quick hits were useful to fill out content.

Glad to hear that though, we might bring em back!


#70

I’m a professional writer, but I pretty much only write about music. Once, I was able to marry that with my love for video games, and I wrote an article about composers in indie video games. The piece is two years old now, so it could do with some updating, but I still think there’s plenty to discover for anyone who hasn’t dug deep into indie game music.

http://daily.redbullmusicacademy.com/2015/06/indie-video-game-composers-feature

Anyway, I’ve got a couple more articles about gaming up my sleeve that I think could be interesting. Thanks for reading!


#71

I like the music and games intersection, it can be really interesting so I’ll give that a read tonight. A friend of mine wrote a great piece on Thumper and Live Music which was excellent IMO.

Do we have any film writers here? As much as I love games, they’re my primary passion and I’ve found it impossible to break into the industry, despite having a press pass and reviewing 80 odd feature films and 3 film festivals for free for the last 2 years. I sometimes wonder if I’m cut out for the whole writing gig!


#72

Film writing is ESPECIALLY hard to break into, IMO. I’m also a huge film buff and have wanted to do more of that on the side, but I’ve found it hard to even work with established publishers for FREE. But if I can give you any words of encouragement, all it takes for your writing to get noticed is time and perseverance. If you’ve got two years of experience and some writing clips already under your belt, I’d say you are well on your way as long as you keep at it. Good luck!


#73

Cheers man. I think part of the problem is my experience is for a free local site in Scotland. They’ve got good press ties because they’re so old, but they’re essentially run for the love of it and so the site looks old and awful, like late 90s bad. Still I am not biting the hand that feeds, they have got me entry to the Scottish Press Day which is basically how you review films in Scotland (it’s a bad system but it’s what we have).

Moving from there is proving tough, I got a reply once from an editor at Paste but it was a pretty brutal call to improve my style and self-editing, even if I didn’t particularly enjoy that guy’s style, which seems to be quite a divisive thing in film writing as opposed to game’s writing.

I am gonna keep plugging away, even though the last stretch of Uni as a mature student has really tested me!


#74

oh, hey, i wrote a short little bit about beorn from the hobbit & the start of zelda a little while ago. it’s pretty good. the mundane impossible. check it out

very rare i write anything these days about games but there it is. scroll down for fiction and other thoughts.


#75

I’m bad at pitching so I generally just write a few times a year and throw it up on a personal tumblr. My friend has a website but I usually just repost things here.

Besides that, I’ve written a piece about the digital Philadelphia located in Homefront: The Resistance. One of my very few successful pitches. I’m happy with how it turned out - besides one or two errors I saw and I just sort of sigh at.

I wish I was more frequent, but I’m very good at making excuses. Other part is just financially supporting it is always a drag - can’t always risk cash on a game that I just won’t like and get nothing out of, and by the time I can get into a game and see enough to know it’s my jam, it’s usually a bit late and I feel like I’m yelling into a void.

Anyone got any advice for pitching and all that? I usually have a few in the back pocket that I have an idea for, but can never seem to get responses from any outlets, which is a bit of a bummer.


#76

I’m new to writing like here’s my first piece of game writing. https://lightspeedwagon.com/2017/05/16/mishima-the-npc/#more-90

I know its not very well written, so if anyone has any recommendations for poise and grammar books that would be great.

I’ve been wanting to do this for awhile, but always had a problem with putting stuff out. I really want to write more though. Thanks for reading if you read it.


#77

Well there’s the danger in “hopefully some day”. Your essay sounds awesome . You should start in on it when you can instead of putting it off, you know? I think everyone knows what the fourth wall is and whatever but Brechtian distanciation techniques and their application, especially in games!, is something I’m sure a lot of people would be interested in but have not previously been exposed to (I only know about him from film and theater classes).


#78

I think it’s too easy getting hung up on logistics and hesitating. If anything you can load up a google doc or a medium page and get your ideas on paper THEN worry about logistics.

And re: being nervous about your opinions- someone is always going to disagree with you. People will get pedantic and weird about anything. But there are also people who would want to learn from you and discuss things with you. And if you’re passionate/open-minded and have a solid footing on what you’re talking about then you have nothing to be nervous about.


#79

I write, record, and edit video essays on film and media. My favorite one I had done for a long time was this one-

why you should care about VIDEO GAMES

Which was about the “games as art” debate, video games and their place in art history (vs especially film and photography), the nature of art criticism, the evolution of criticism of film and photography and how critics are often anti-innovation, etc. It’s very “me” to have a video that talks at length about The Stanley Parable, SH2, and Undertale, but also cinemascope and Charlie Brooker. I am really proud of this one and it was my first essay to be featured on a non-film publication (Polygon!).


#80

I literally just posted a preliminary review of The Surge in a new thread before I saw this thread. I probably should have posted it here, but since I’ve already made the thread, here it is. (please tell me how terrible it is so I can be less terrible the next time)

I’ve wanted to get into games writing for a while, so I guess this is my chance. I’ve got another article I’ve been meaning to write about One Shot, and another about the design of PUBG, so I should probably get on that.