Sleeping problems


#22

My own personal experience is that Daylight lamps are great for maintaining the “get up at the same time every day” even through winter, but I don’t have any sever sleeping problems, just general mental health related stuff.

These foam earplugs are great, no idea if they are available in the USA

Ohropax Soft Foam Earplugs


#23

Besides trying to do some of that other good advice for cycles I also take zzquil every night. It helps me fall asleep quicker and if I do wake up during the night or earlier in the morning it allows me to actual go back to sleep until I want to wake up!


#24

Cutting caffeine and taking a light dose of melatonin works wonders. Melatonin is also amazing for treating jetlag.

It’s generally extremely safe. No known lethal dosage in humans, no known permanent side effects from short- or long-term use, and the most common side effect is strange dreams. However, it is possible to build a melatonin dependency, to the point where you’ll have difficulty sleeping without it. It can take a week or two to fully break that dependency. So it’s definitely a good idea to stick to low doses (1-5 mg).

And it’s worth mentioning that melatonin requires a prescription in most of Europe and Asia.


#26

Just want to chime in with a few more recs. I take doxepin which is good at keeping me asleep (and if I do get up during the night, I fall back asleep really fast.) Some days I also add melatonin and diphenhydramine (allergy pills & zzzquil) which gets me drowsy. My doctor said there is no adverse reaction for mixing these and I will sometimes skip doxepin and rely on the other two when I will have less than 8 hours of sleep (going asleep late + waking early). Melatonin gives me some fucked up dreams for some reason though…


#27

There is a reason melatonin is sold in such high doses, but it’s dumb. Don’t take more than 1mg, optimal amount is likely to be less than that.

From UpToDate:

Studies point in a similar direction when taking melatonin for Sleep Phase Disorders.


#29

Try this new technique:
1 sit with legs apart, ready to sway.
2Play some soft, slow music such as Roberta Flack’s Killing me softly or other soft, slow music.
3Sway slowly from side to side, while swaying, breathe very slowly Sing or humming along softly if desired

In no time, you might get sleepy!


#38

I just started playing this on my desktop before I went to bed:

It actually helps, strangely enough.

Has anyone had experience with weighted blankets?


#40

Over-the-counter melotonin can sometimes help from what I’ve heard, though iirc there are a lot of people who recommend not getting too attached to it to get to sleep all the time.

Personally, I’ve found that routine helps. Lately I’ve been having some non-caffeinated tea before going to bed, then popping on an app that plays rain sounds. I used to live in Florida, and I got all my best sleep down there when it was raining. The sound of it used to make everyone in my house tired and ready for bed. If you can sleep with noise, it might help.


#41

I’ve been using one for a few months. They can definitely help, but they’re not a cure-all. I tend to have terrible stress/anxiety-related insomnia, and with the blanket it feels a lot more manageable. Though I’d mostly just recommend them for being extremely comfortable. While I don’t toss and turn nearly as much as I used to, there’ll still be nights where I’m wide awake at 5am and the weighted blanket is doing nothing but keeping me warm and stationary.

With that said, I love mine and would not want to go back to sleeping without it. The quality of my sleep feels like it’s gotten so much better with it, especially when I’m being good about sleeping habits and stress management. It hasn’t been a night and day difference, but it has been noticeable.


#44

Do exercise regularly and also mind relaxing activities like meditation to reduce stress.


#45

Tea might help. I recommend this blog post- it has info about how does sleepy time tea work and list of bed time teas

Hope this helps :wink:


#46

I started CPAP therapy about 3 weeks ago since I was diagnosed with severe sleep apnea. I’m not sure how well it’s working, since I’m still incredibly tired and unmotivated during the morning before work. At least I don’t need to sleep as much on weekends now, and I’m not suffering from sleep attacks at work as often as I was.

I’d probably still recommend going to a sleep clinic. Apnea is one of those conditions that goes critically under-diagnosed due to how normalized the act of snoring is, when it should be a sign that you’re not getting good sleep.


#47

It’s all about routine. Here’s an example of how I manage it:

I get up at the same time every day, and go to bed at the same time too, regardless whether I have a day off or not, I never have a lie in. This way my body understands that time is my bedtime.
I only lie down if I am intending to sleep (same principle as above) and, unlike you may hear others say, I don’t read, watch TV, listen to music etc. in bed. The idea is that if I really can’t sleep I would get out of bed to do these things, again so my body learns what ‘bed’ is for.
I don’t drink caffeine or eat sugar after 7 pm, for obvious reasons.
It’s also important that you are comfortable in bed. Sounds stupid, but if you’ve been sleeping with two pillows for years and actually you’re more comfortable with one for combination sleepers… which happened to me, exactly.

It’s all very simple really. The difficulty is sticking with it.