Snoop Dogg is Banned—The Community That Reinvented 'Def Jam: Fight for NY'

#1

Spend any amount of time in the fighting game community and you’ll find that folks will play just about anything competitively. If it pits two players against one another in an esoteric test of skill, there’s a good chance that someone will have a setup for it at a major fighting game tournament, even (and sometimes especially) if it skews from genre norms. Even so, when one looks at Def Jam: Fight for NY, the phrase “competitively viable” doesn’t immediately come to mind. But when put in the hands of a small but dedicated community, this competent wrestling game becomes a legitimate competitive experience.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://waypoint.vice.com/en_us/article/yw8jnx/snoop-dogg-is-banned-community-that-reinvented-def-jam-fight-for-ny
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#2

Great read. Had no idea there was a community around this game. Having played a bunch of Def Jam Vendetta back in the day, this series always sat with me as a kind of over the top fun wrestling type party game, not something people would play competitively. Granted, I was pretty young then and didn’t really know about casual vs. competitive play, but still. It is pretty cool to get a look at how a game like this, as old and obscure as it is, develops into something with a dedicated following, even if it’s a small one.

#3

I’m gonna go ahead and once again say that Def Jam FFNY is the best game to come out on PS2.

I never knew that there was a competetive scene, this is really fascinating and exciting.

Edit: This quote is brilliant:

"If you like games about reading your opponent, this is that. If you enjoy pro wrestling, it has that. If you wanted to have Ludacris fight Ice-T in a stage that looks suspiciously similar to the club from Ong Bak, you are playing the right game.