Spider-Man is a public health menace


#1

I was playing one of the science side missions in Spider-Man which involved combating a bacterial infection in fish by pouring antibiotics directly into the ocean. It’s also implied that the fish would go out into the ocean and spread the antibiotics around.

This is very bad.

Antibacterial resistant superbugs occur as a result of the overuse of antibiotics. Spider-Man dumps a massive payload into the ocean, and guarantees that they’ll spread. The likelihood at bacteria will develop a resistance to a payload of that magnitude is pretty high.

Jonah Jameson is right. Spider-Man is a public menace.


#2

I dunno if it makes I difference but I would have sworn it said “vaccine” instead of antibiotics.

edit: just for the record, I’m not crazy, it’s what the mission’s called even if the dialogue doesn’t match up

Summary

https://youtu.be/H9VsdjFw4FQ


#3

It’s a bacterial infection. A vaccine wouldn’t have done the trick.


#4

All the science stations are really bad at doing actual science, but that’s what you get when you let an MBA build them. :wink:


#5

Hey I just heard on J. Jonah Jameson’s podcast that Spider-Man was dumping anti-biotics in the ocean and turning the fish gay :thinking:


#6

Harry also creates a plastic-eating bacteria that Spider-Man “tests” by just dumping into an open trash can and turns the cellular network into a virtually insta-kill electrocution system.

I’m only about halfway through (the game and the research stations) but I think this whole game might be Harry Osborne’s origin story.


#7

Yeah, Insomniac really dropped the ball on the science in this Spiderman game. The explanation they give for Peter’s abilities (bit by a radioactive spider) is pretty implausible.


#8

I enjoy the lab work minigames. The research stations obviously suffer by being open world activities. But I did find those smoke stacks in clear violation of the EPA.


#9

As an Australian it seems pretty implausible that you’d get bitten by a spider and live, regardless of radioactivity.