Tell me your hypothetical ideal game idea


#1

We’ve all thought about what game we’d like to see made and wished vainly against the odds would come to pass. I’ll tell you mine if you tell me yours.

  1. Prequel Mass Effect game about Citadel Security SWAT. In my fever dreams the game has the tactical planning of Old Rainbow Six combined with mass effect powers against an outside space gangster story a la Scorsese but with glory years bioware (or even better obsidian/black isle writing) with LA Noire facial tech and interrogation. Toy could even planet hop with liaison missions with specific species’ police forces. No world saving or galactic peril, just space cops taking on space crooks and trying to live life in the pre reaper galactic society. You could also finally be a non human lead character.

  2. Anachronox 2

  3. A dark souls style action rpg (combat wise) with far more story and choice set in at least vaguely realistic feudal Europe or the crusades and outremer states with a meaningful and serious take on the violence, social upheaval, and cultural exchanges of the times.

They don’t have to be good ideas or realistic ideas, just your ideas. I’d love to hear your pie in the sky ideas.


#2

The Witcher 3 is that Dark Souls style game that you’re looking for. It’s what you described to a T. Just add monsters to the vaguely realistic Europe.


#3

@Mellzilla I’ve played Witcher 3 and unfortunately just hate the combat. I think it feels awful. Neither turning the difficulty up or down made it better for me. I am a big fan of Witcher 1 and 2, but where the strong narrative throughout and pacing kept me focused despite bad combat, I think the open world structure of 3 hurt the narrative pacing a lot. I like Witcher 3 quite a bit, but sadly not as much as either prior Witcher or even the recent modern crpgs like pillars of eternity or tyranny.

Appreciate the thought of recommendation though. Thanks!


#4

a rhythm game RPG where, in a pseudo-medieval world, an ancient evil awakens and begins Destroying Shit. you travel around the world honing an ancient magic (the music - I originally thought of this related to rap but you could pick basically any genre) by awakening the spirits of old masters (based on, of course, the real-world legends of the music genre) who teach you new techniques, all in order to defeat the evil thing. the combat is turn-based with your attacks/techniques succeeding or failing to degrees based on your execution of them (the rhythm component).


#5

A game where you must hold in your farts while car pooling. In the background is a very sad story to juxtapose the farting


#6

-A Harvest Moon or Stardew Valley-type game but the farming is replaced by something I actually wanna do in a game.

-A Style Savvy style game but you’re in a fantasy world putting together outfits for adventurers, so as well as style, your outfits need to have good stats for their builds.

maybe these could be the same game, now that I think about it


#7

I’ll tell you one I kick myself for not really doing but it takes some setup.

I’ve been messing around in game development since 1999 or 2000, mostly fangames at first but about ten years ago I finally started inching my way towards original products. That’s because, in 2002 or so a friend needed isometric sprites for a project he was working on and asked his friends to contribute because it was a parody game about the community we were all in.

I got him his sprites, but I made a little minigame out of it. I took zombie sprites from Diablo 2 and sounds from Resident Evil and I mixed them all together with hand-made headstones and fences in to this small maze. After I gave him his sprites I continued to poke at this little maze game I’d made and I sent it to a few more friends to see what they thought of it, but one of them told me something unexpected: it scared them.

It scared them?

It wasn’t my intention to scare anyone – zombies were just a generic enemy, there was barely any gameplay, but somehow I’d stumbled upon creating a creepy enough atmosphere that I spooked a friend of mine.

But what is scary? How do you define it? For the next five years, I tried to figure this out. I thought hard about what “scary” is. The end result came out in 2005, my first original game, called “The House.” Downloads aren’t available anymore because it uses a lot of stolen assets (I didn’t have confidence in my own abilities), but some people have told me it’s a legitimately scary game and that’s because it heavily leans on the unknown and the unpredictable. It’s a fairly generic setup: you are investigating a haunted house and there are a lot of scary set pieces.

The catch is that none of the game is scripted. I’d learned about how narratives build up to a climax so I ended up implementing a dynamic system where every room had multiple kinds of scary events that could happen, and the player had free reign to explore at their leisure. Think of it like Left 4 Dead’s AI director, but instead of controlling how many zombies you face, it controls what happens in a given room. Maybe you just hear creaky floorboards, but as the invisible tension meter raises, maybe chairs start to move. A television you passed in one room has turned itself on. Knives fly off the kitchen counter. Hallucinations. You are either killed by the ghosts, or you figure out the secret to escape.

For the record, Left 4 Dead came out in 2008. My game had an AI Director three years before theirs did.

The problem: the game was in 2D. It was still isometric. I was big on “connecting” the player to the gameplay on screen. When you started, it asked you for your name, and that would even be incorporated in to the gameplay. Immersion was key. But that’s hard to do with sprite art ripped from Zombies Ate My Neighbors and a top down, third-person camera.

So after “The House” came out in 2005, I began writing a design document for a bigger, better, more robust version of the same concept, but this time, as a first person game. This was right at the start of the big ghost hunting TV craze, so I wrote it up as you being a cameraman for a small news station sent out to the local haunted mansion in the middle of the woods. You were to shoot a puff piece with a snide reporter. “We go in, I pretend to hear all these spooky sounds, and we dub it all in during post. It’s what everybody does. Easy money.

Of course, that wouldn’t be the case.

All the tenants from The House would be present – you’d be free to explore the entire mansion with no clearly definable path, and as you played, an invisible director would ramp up the tension and the scares. The camera gimmick meant your hands were always occupied and you had to rely on your partner for environmental interactions. They’d also be your connection to the world; they’d comment on things the player couldn’t experience, like smells and the feel of texture. I’d even written scenarios where maybe your partner panics and starts acting as if they’re hearing things that aren’t actually audible to the player. But the general idea would be to never fully commit one way or the other if it was something actually supernatural in order to keep players guessing (and maintain a suspension of disbelief).

I’d also envisioned other ways to draw the player in to the world. I envisioned it as a Half-Life 2 mod so I could have access to their Havok Physics engine just for environmental interaction. I’d also thought of many more events, like a pseudo-branching pathway system where the game gave you free reign to tackle a situation multiple ways but wouldn’t necessarily convey to you that you were making a choice (an early one is that the game would start with you and your partner in a taxi that was to drop you off at the mansion; your partner would prompt you to pay the driver and either you could walk up and press the use key to pay him or you could just book it and run without paying)

I’d actually written a somewhat meaty design document, with basic puzzle mechanics and a narrative flow that would eventually leave the player character feeling totally hopeless, but I never developed the skills to create 3D maps or models. Even now, I still haven’t learned. So, the design document got filed away on my computer for “later.”

Seven years later, we enter the new horror game renaissance. Games like Slender and Outlast nail the feeling of being a cameraman who can only witness the horrors unfold before them. At some point, I remember reading an article by the developers behind Amnesia: The Dark Descent, describing their methods for creating a spooky game, and I thought “Wow, we came to some of the same conclusions” for how to do horror.

Today, I still haven’t learned 3D modeling and the horror game ideas I stumbled on some ten years ago are starting to feel a little played out by other developers who got to them before I could.


#8

A Fable-like game where you play as a villain following a hero and ruining his/her accomplishments. Your methods influence your monster form (brute force being more beastly, manipulation making you more demonic, etc).


#9

Da Share Z0ne helps anime people take down capitalist overloards with the power of break dancing and capoeira.
3d brawler where after successfully making a sick dance combo, baddys freeze allowing for chained finishers.


#10

Game idea 1: it’s a MOBA, but it has Dark Souls characters and combat. I want a party of Lautrec, Petrus, and Paladin Leeroy to square off against a Crestfallen Knight, Kirk of Thorns and Andre of Astora. Is that too much to ask? Obviously the biggest challenge here is balancing how fast the leveling happens. It’s got to be faster than regular Dark Souls, but can’t be so fast that a small advantage starts to snowball.

Game idea 2: based on the short novel The Wendigo. There are 5 playable classes (British Doctor, Scottish Junior Priest, French Canuck, English Canadian Woodsman, Indigenous Cook). The forest is procedurally generated. The hunting party will be forced to split into two at some point. The objective is to have a successful moose hunt, though fishing and other animals may be hunted as well. Also don’t let the Wendigo kill your party members.


#11

I just want to actually vent real quick that I totally had the idea for a game about finding a stranger’s phone and having to piece together the events of their life / one significant event that led to the loss of the phone but several games have beat me to it. (Beat me to it in the sense that, having no programming/art ability, I was never going to be able to make it anyway. BUT STILL). The Mr. Robot Game and A Normal Lost Phone both executed on this idea and I’m so jealous I wasn’t the one who did it


#12

Ni no Kuni, but instead of gathering emotions you’re gathering pieces of clothing.

You were sent from Earth to a different, fantastic world where most people are poorly dressed. Your goal is to show them that it’s okay to be stylish and feel beautiful.

Your compendium, instead of showing spells and the familiars, is in this scenario a book about fashion you bought on Earth because you were into that. Thanks to it, you initially have an idea of how to sew/weave clothes (you get better at it through practice) that you can give to the local citizens, improving their life and happiness.

The battle would be similar to the demon negotiation process in Persona; you can talk the other human enemies into giving up and letting you help them, but you can also kill them to steal their rags and dismantle them for materials (that leads to the bad ending where you become a fashion mogul only interested in profit).


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#13

A non-combat immersive sim.


#14

Persona but instead of going into dungeons you and your friends work together to design clothes for one another. Game includes plenty of character customization.

Edit: [quote=“pedroteixeira, post:12, topic:3158”]
Ni no Kuni, but instead of gathering emotions you’re gathering pieces of clothing.

You were sent from Earth to a different, fantastic world where most people are poorly dressed. Your goal is to show them that it’s okay to be stylish and feel beautiful.

Your compendium, instead of showing spells and the familiars, is in this scenario a book about fashion you bought on Earth because you were into that. Thanks to it, you initially have an idea of how to sew/weave clothes (you get better at it through practice) that you can give to the local citizens, improving their life and happiness.

The battle would be similar to the demon negotiation process in Persona; you can talk the other human enemies into giving up and letting you help them, but you can also kill them to steal their rags and dismantle them for materials (that leads to the bad ending where you become a fashion mogul only interested in profit).
[/quote]

Oh shit!


#15

After I read Tsutomu Nihei’s BLAME! which is a SUPER bleak world where everything is just inside a giant seemingly infinite cyberpunk maze of machine architecture millenia after anyone remembers what the earth or even the SKY is I really wanted a procedurally generated roguelike in a world like that, picking up vague snippets of what the hell is going on but never fully understanding. Which is what i felt throughout this manga.


#16

I want we love katamari but as an online environment where you can roll up other people - it’s just a massive world.


#17

what about a Katamari MMO where you and 500 of your best friends drop into a giant world and everybody just rolls shit up for a while and chills?


#18

Ghost Recon Meets Shadow of Mordor.

You’re a soldier in the army but your Battalion is sent into an alternate past where there are monsters and magic and shit. You initially set up in the woods to observe but end up being drawn into a town to save them from orcs. From there you set up a base of operations and start building up the town to protect it. You can recruit mages and warriors and shit and adapt their stuff into your loadout. Wizards can enchant your bullets or guns, ballistic armor, summon a dragon with a tank round, the whole 9. Imagine HALO chuting into a castle wearing plate mail and carrying an M4.


#19

My ideal game used to be “A Bethesda game, but not broken”, but BotW exists now so…

I have this vague notion of a game I want to see, that uses the scientific method as an underlying metaphor: Start with a Souls game meets Shadow of the Colossus, so only a handful of enemies that matter, but each one is enormous, and stupidly impossible to assault. The player will die over and over again, but a very robust bloodstain type system would allow players who survive a bit longer to explain (or maybe demonstrate in a sort of ghost tutorial) what they did in detail. A leader board would rank players (and offer cosmetic rewards) by how many people succeeded after reading their advice and those stains would be more likely to appear on people’s subsequent attempts. Lastly, the whole thing would be against Lovecraftian Elder Gods IN SPAAACE!


#20

There were these Roblox maps way back when where you were in a full scale hotel or city and it was hit by waves of disasters. The winner was the one who could survive the longest by running around the map and being lucky. That as a full size game.