We Need to Get Ready for GamerGate Politicans

#1

Content Warning: This piece includes racist language and references to rape threats.

One of the most prominent anti-feminist voices during GamerGate has turned towards politics, having been named a candidate for the European Parliament representing UKIP, a political party with a bent towards xenophobia, racism, and anti-immigration. It helped push the UK towards its infamous Brexit vote in 2016, which the country continues to wrestle with, and has yet to find a real path forward on.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://waypoint.vice.com/en_us/article/597z7d/we-need-to-get-ready-for-gamergate-politicans
#2
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#3

As much as I appreciate you talking about this, I sincerely question your decision of directly linking to a bunch of Sargon’s Bullshit videos.

Even though you try to frame them correctly, you are also giving this guy a platform and an avenue to spread his message around and I really doubt that this was necessary.

Edit: So I went ahead and clicked on a bunch of links, because I figured that maybe you did a sneaky thing and linked to different videos, but nope. Now YouTube thinks that I might be interested in 3 hour long rants about how feminism is ruining the world.

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#4

GamerGate reprobates getting into politics is definitely a problem but I would hesitate to call UKIP mainstream.

#5

God, please don’t ever straight click-through on questionable links. Right-click and hit open in incognito.
(Good point, by the way.)

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#6

I mean I have the whole recommended videos thing on YouTube blocked, but yeah. It wasn’t the smartest decision.

#7

Fascism is on the rise in general and that Gamergate shit was a byproduct of it, the other GGers that joined the neonazi movements (Cernovich, Milo, etc) may not have become politicians themselves but they’re now cheering the new nazi parties.

UKIP is currently on the decline since their star politician Nigel Farage left and founded a competing party, that’s why they’re now taking scum like this guy. I believe they previously rejected him as too racist but that was before Farage split.

#8

Reading this story makes me sick. The idea that these people who came out of the toxic environment gaming had years ago are now possibly going on to be create and formulating policy.

#9

UKIP seemed to be a vehicle for Nigel Farage and Brexit more than anything. Nearly all their other members seemed like a complete and utter joke. Not least of all Paul Nuttals who took over the party when Farage stepped down. Nuttals couldn’t even get elected in the Stoke-on-Trent by-election of 2017. I grew up around Stoke and it famously voted Leave in Brexit and had become known as a UKIP stronghold. UKIP have been pretty much dead in the water ever since Farage left, with himself founding a new parted because even he can’t be seen as being associated with UKIP.

Of course, even if UKIP are mostly a joke. Doesn’t mean we should dismiss them or Trump enabled gamergaters like Sargon as a joke. I’m fully convinced based on his history, Sargon will find some way to shoot himself in the foot and fail completely.

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#10

-clears throat-

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

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#11

It has already got worse:

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#12

I literally just spent the last 5 minutes angrily punching my desk and screaming “NOOOO NO NO NO NO”.

Fucking god dammit, AAAAAARGH

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#13

Local Swindon Branch of UKIP already wants him gone. Off to a flying start when you lost the people who are supposed to support your campaign at the grass roots.

There always has to be a degree of awareness how dangerous it is though. Especially since EU elections are proportional representation and he might drive some 3rd/4th round to Brexit party and Tories.

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#14

it doesn’t look like mr. sargon. of . dakkad ??? is going anywhere fast in the real world of politics, which is promising. seems that he’s been shredded by his existing, unhidden body of work that’s out here on the internet. goodnight, guy.

on the same side of that coin, i guess; i’ve recently considered getting involved in my local government, but ultimately pulled back on the idea based on the fact that within the last fifteen years i’ve said some heinous shit on the internet. things that simply exist, that i regret, that will live forever. i feel like i could do some good in my community, but … … if anybody wanted to hunt down some shit on me, on the internet, they probably could. which i guess makes me a bad candidate. i’ll live, and no tears shed for mr. sargonz, but the #internet world is brutal, eh.

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#15

I’ve been turning this comment over in my head and listening to Klepek’s section on this week’s Waypoint Radio clicked my thoughts into place with this.

I think observers of UK politics who keep regularly up-to-date would agree with the above. Since the 2016 Brexit referendum, UKIP has, to a large extent, lost both its raison d’être and most effective politician (Farage, who went to become a Fox News talking head before recently returning to found a competing far-right party). In a way, I do agree with this:

But I don’t think it’s as simple as that, even from a zoomed-out perspective. I think UKIP’s role here is complicated by its international reputation as well as how it is working on the domestic front.

I live in Wales. Between 2016 and 2018, Neil Hamilton was the Group Leader of UKIP in the Welsh Assembly. If you’re from a certain (older than I) generation, Neil Hamilton is associated with corruption and sleaze. A Conservative MP until 1997, he was implicated in the cash-for-questions scandal (effectively a political bribery scandal – Wikipedia) and thrashed in the next general election.

Hamilton has parlayed his membership of UKIP into some kind of political rehabilitation. Able to continue working in politics under a new guise has, in some ways, laundered his reputation and minimised the ongoing consequences of his misdeeds. It’s too early to say (he stood as UKIP’s candidate in a recent Welsh by-election and came in third), but it’s certainly put him in some kind of limelight.

I think this article discusses a similar laundering, but it’s for a different audience. UKIP is a party with an outsized reputation for an international audience than its polling numbers indicate; there is a crop of people who know UKIP because of Brexit. I’d include many well-intentioned Americans in this – they might not know their Iain Duncan Smiths from their Kate Hoeys, but they know UKIP.

Even if Benjamin does not win a seat in the European Parliament, being able to be listed on a ballot paper does legitimise him and may give him further inroads into the spaces in which he already has an audience and it also helps convert his current audience into people who associate UKIP with a respectable politics of some sort.

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#16

If it makes you feel better, the fact that you recognize the bad shit you have said in the past and have made a conscious effort to move away and toward something better is admirable. People say stupid shit all the time, and as a generation who has grown up living on the internet, it is something we just need to acknowledge. As long as you still do not hold those views (like Sargon) then you should be fine. If you are interested in local politics then you should absolutely get involved!

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#17

Judging by that press conference, it gives me faith that Sargon will do what he always does and shoot himself in the foot and fail miserably. This is what happens when you carve a niche for youself from hate and decide this is how you want to define yourself.

#18

Personally, I think a lot of the reason UKIP and to a lesser extent the BNP got hold is that they put up a front of respectability and political competence. Xenophobia was part of the rhetoric but it was wrapped up in local issues. At the same time, it can be their undoing. I used to live near Barking when the 2010 GE was on and while it was tense and Nick Griffin had a legit shot. Labour and the Tories did a really good local campaign that highlighted just how little work the BNP were doing with their council elected reps while they still claimed the maximum expenses. It turned out the council head for Labour did more housing casework than the entire BNP. Griffin came third and the BNP got wiped for an all Labour council. So it can matter how competent they are depending on how it effects people (Also why Farage has failed seven times for British parliament. He’s a protest vote in Europe but no one trusts his acumen in parliament (Especially his notorious expenses record)

Carl is going to have a different reception because a lot of those who liked the front of UKIP being suited politicians aren’t going to go for people saying the quiet part through a megaphone and go to the Brexit party. Gerald Batten is already having a difficult time (An expenses scandal will do that, especially when under investigation and he’s already in a swing seat). Also from what I noticed, Farage is sending people in that region because it’s been such a stronghold before that he could cave the UKIP vote and the Tory press wasn’t amused at Carl’s antics to back him either. Like not waiting till the Comcast merger is over before you insult Murdoch owned media. Saying that direct to Sky News while they are still Murdoch owned? That’s some galaxy brain thinking there.

At the same time, I’m not sure about “Legitimising” just being on the ballot sheet. The only reason Carl can get on there is that someone is putting up his deposit of €5000 and he will have to submit expenses to the electoral commission. It’s not the great British tradition of paying £500 deposit to take the piss in a general election but there has been protest candidates for EU seats before. He’s not the first or last.

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#21

Welcome to mainstream politics where everything you said on record can and will be used against you.

Original report and tip off from UKIP member was published in the Daily Mail so you can imagine how badly this is going to go down in conservative circles.