Worst Addition to Modern Day Lingo?


#1

As we draw closer and closer to newspeak, feel free to share the most obnoxious, senseless, reductive term to have entered modern day vernacular before we are absorbed into the lingoverse. For me it’s this odd bastardization of “low key” which apparently has almost replaced the usage of “kind of/sort of” for no discernible reason? I don’t really get but it low key makes me mad… fuck!

(wipes old-man glasses)

Discuss…


#2

Prescriptivism is :-1:

Language evolves organically with use, and it’s not my place to weigh in on how other people speak (except if that speech is hateful)


#3

I’m both glad and disappointed that somebody came in here to say what I was going to.


#4

I was going to post the same thing as @Highwire as I clicked on the topic, but now that I’ve read the post I can definitely say “newspeak” and “lingoverse” are the worst. :slight_smile:


#5

George Orwell coined “newspeak” not me :slight_smile:


#6

Okay honestly, as much as I hate prescriptivism, “Could care less” still really gets to me.


#7

Yeah but his context was way different. :smiley:


#8

Also, word of caution with this sort of thing: more often than not, slams against “modern slang” are indirectly slams against AAVE, and discounting that aspect of it is not great


#9

On topic: Tech utopians really need to stop trying to make Esperanto happen
It’s not gonna happen


#10

I’ve gotten the sense as of recently there has been a race to create new terms in a throw-at-a-board-and-see-what-sticks kind of way. It never came to me as organic evolution as much as the race to create the next new meme with very little artfulness or care to make things clearer or more interesting sounding. If I’m alone in that I apologize. I can see how it may be a way to individualize. But certain terms become so pervasive so quickly without seeming to go through any meaningful social green-lighting before I am forced to re-understand a word or phrase. Also lingo like this is designed to be a fad (like for most of history) and will be made fun of along side “goovy” “fly” or “daddy-o” in the future; a fleeting cultural moment for the old man shaking his cane at the youngun’s kind of critique to happen before it moves on to the next. I tried to be more humorous about it but I guess it came across somehow else; like I didn’t even know I could be confused with a prescriptivist (is that a word?) who might be actually serious about this.


#11

white people, mostly


#12

I hate all words I don’t understand until I understand them. Then they all right.

I also agree with literally (not figuratively) everything Highwire said!


#13

People saying “af” instead of “as fuck” kinda drives me insane.


#14

Okay actually though when I hear someone say “el oh el” out loud I go temporarily mad.


#15

dogg you should most definitely look into prescriptivism vs descriptivism. It’s actually really interesting and basically things like the Académie française seem like unfortunate and futile attempts to cage what is a living and growing thing. (For those who don’t want to google the aforementioned Academie, it is an organization in France that decides what is and isn’t French.

We’re totally not disparaging you as a person with this stuff. Just that there is a school of thought that language has to be THIS THING that comes with a whole lot of baggage that ends up being real unfortunate. I totally understand that you don’t want Fetch to be a thing. It’s just that that sort of thing has some connotations you were probably unaware of.

Also @vinone I love af. I actually just say it as written in my head now? I also like jokes in pop culture about older figures misunderstanding the phrase as dumb as that may be.


#16

The word ‘doke’ is the worst addition to the contemporary vernacular.

…Just kidding, I would never speak ill of the almighty doke. I swear!


#17

ALSO: To tie this into the whole Gaming thing. There’s a game that was kickstarted not too long ago and is due for release in July called Dialect. Here’s a quote taken from the kickstarter page cause I don’t know that I could really say it any better?

Dialect is a tabletop roleplaying game about an isolated community, their language, and what it means for that language to be lost. It’s a GM-less game for 3-5 people that runs in 3-4 hours. The game’s core spark comes from gradually build­ing up elements of language among players, who gain fluency in their own dialect over the course of play. Words are built off of the fundamental traits of the community, the pivotal events that have defined their lives, and how they respond to a changing world. Players use the language and explore both their characters and the world by asking what this new language really means to them. A new word is made, the language grows, and the community is tightened.

From age to age, the Isolation changes and we see those changes reflected in the language. In the end, you’ll define how the language dies and what happens to the Isolation. Players take away both the story they’ve told together and this new language.

This sounds like a game that is so far up my alley that I accidentally mispronounced its name while using the Floo (I’m sorry) but I can’t really afford to kickstart games, as much as I’d love to, since money buys things like food and gas that I need to live.


#18

Ironically as I’ve gotten older I’ve taken more and more toward the descriptive. And as someone who studied and admired classic literature throughout high school and college (and eventually getting an English degree) it’s something I have to constantly talk myself down from getting upset over.

It’s so hard to kinda shrug your shoulders and say “if a thing’s gonna be, let it be” but it’s nice to have something to work towards. We adapt and change, and our language should as well.

…you kids still can’t play on my lawn though. Shoo!


#19

I haven’t heard someone say it in real life, but I cringe hard anytime I see someone post “kek” in a chat.


#20

Okay yeah, along similar lines, I’ve gotten real annoyed at someone who said the word “hashtag” out loud, preceding a word.